How To Avoid Being The Graduating Senior Everyone Hates


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Nice Move


You never thought this year would come. You’ve watched the classes above you slowly make their way out into the world. As much as you love and look up to the older sisters, sometimes one, or more of them, can become a different person in her senior year. She becomes a diva, is twice as judgemental as usual, and she quickly becomes the voice that you instinctively roll your eyes at, regardless of what she’s saying. You always swear to yourself and your pledge class, I’m never going to be like that as a senior, until you are one and you become exactly her. Don’t let that be your story. Keep your promise to yourself and to others, be a gracious and kind senior who will make girls weep for having lost your wonderful spirit and personality to a polyester cap and gown. Don’t be the senior that everyone hates.

Accept And Embrace The Changes In Your Chapter

It’s time for a reality check: the chapter you love so dearly today is not the same one you fell in love with four years ago, and that’s okay. Chapters and people change, all the time. It’s something to be celebrated. It’s easy in Greek life to long for the past lives of sisters who came before you. Girls who earned their letters through pledging and weren’t gifted them immediately on bid day. Girls who didn’t have to worry about their keg stand being posted on Facebook. Life was simpler, but today we have amazing things like Instagram, Snapchat filters, and Facetune (bless up). My point is, things are going to change so don’t get stuck living in the past. Don’t micromanage and nitpick every detail of how sisters choose to run the chapter. It’s fine to offer wisdom and advice on how they can avoid past mistakes, but you need to let the next generation take the reins. In short, it’s time to start letting go.

Remain An Actively Involved Member

Yes, this means actually showing up to sorority events. Keeping the last tip in mind, I should point out that letting go does not equal peacing out. The reputation of your chapter sits on the back of every member from the oldest senior to the youngest freshman. Yes you have real world concerns now like job applications, a postgrad living situation, or the ever pertinent question: are you going to grad school? But that doesn’t mean you should flake on your chapter. It does, however, mean you should drink more wine. Keep going to service events, study hours, and chapter meetings. Maintain the reputation you’ve worked for the last four years to create. So what if none of the older girls helped out when you were a freshman? Be better than those seniors were. If your chapter is top tier when only half of you are trying, just imagine what you could be if everyone contributed. It can be a tough balance to manage learning to let go and still being involved. Just remember this: you don’t have to do much, just show up.

Don’t Be A “Last” Girl

My last formal!
My last recruitment!
My last time registering for spring classes!
My last coffee run to that campus spot I’ve only been to three times before!

Every year a new batch of college students revel in the time they have remaining in the hallowed halls of the institution they’ve called home for the last four years. This nostalgic time causes many of them to focus on the fact that many of their annual events or daily routines are happening for the last time. Newsflash: every time you do something for the “last” time, does not require a Facebook status, Instagram post, or a sappy message in the chapter GroupMe about how short your time at college is and the young girls should really appreciate it. You can mourn the ending of an era on your own personal time or with other seniors experiencing the same things, because frankly, nobody else cares. This year is not all about you just because you’re gone at the end of it, so get over your obsession with everything you do happening for potentially the last time, and just enjoy the moments you have left. Plus, if for some reason it wasn’t your “last” everything and you came back after proudly touting the completion of your time at school, it would be real awkward.


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